The story of Nathaniel McHorney's 1901 trip to Ecuador.

January 15th, 1901

The page for Tuesday, January 15th says:

Morning bright and nearing
Colon. Some excitement, Will
we get our mail onboard SS Allianca
leaving at Noon.
Harbor of Colon impresses one ---
12 pekges cause concern
Met Capt Crossman - Mr Prescott
Trip by rail pleasant. many sights
of canal work - over 200 millions spent.
Boy on top of freight car 1/2 the way.
Sight of nude children. Oranges, palms
cocoanuts galore. Panama reached,
say good bye to pleasant travelling
companions. Our train or car run
down to La Boca to catch the tug
Bolivar then trasferred to Manavi
Sail 8 p.m. 3 pieces of baggage missing
Nicolas comes to "Comerote numero diez"
to inform us supper is ready.
I no sabe - he no sabe big grins.
says their is a pair of us.
Think of not being able to tell
when you invited to eat.
Menu is in Spanish.
Philadephia - man of war is in harbor.
We are now sailing under the
British Flag - Glad I've my US passport
(as always, you can click on the image to get a larger view)
 
Questions and comments:
  • I have no idea what the word before “children” is on the 11th line. Thanks to Mike Rossetti for identifying the word as “nude”.
  • This day describes landing in Colon, and taking the Panama railway across the isthmus to Panama (city), and catching another ship.
  • Colon is a sea port on the Atlantic side of Panama (in 1901, there was no Panama, it was part of Columbia).
  • Panama is a sea port on the Pacific side of Panama.
  • In 1895, Captain Crossman was the captain of the Allanca when it was fired upon by a Spanish warship.
  • In 1903, Herbert G. Prescott was the assistant superintendent of the Panama Railroad.
  • “Camarote numero diez” (not Comerote) means “Cabin number ten” in Spanish.
  • [August 13] Corrected the name of the ship to “Manavi”
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